Match stick making.
Vintage Logging

Vintage logging – articles

Each Saturday morning I review 10 vintage logging, forestry and saw milling photos. This Saturday morning almost didn’t happen due to a Photo library issue on the computer. While the up-to-date library is lost, I was able to dig around and retrieve a backup that is about a year old. So without further ado, this week’s review of vintage logging are various articles in relation to forestry and manufacturing of lumber.

Click on the images to view larger pictures.

1905 Henry L. Yesler Sawmill.
1905 Henry L. Yesler Sawmill.

Text engraved on plaque: Henry L. Yesler built here the first steam sawmill on Puget Sound in 1852. This tablet was erected by the Washington University State Historical Society, November 13, 1905. Eagle Brass Foundry, Seattle.


Remember Eddy Matches?
Remember Eddy Matches?

Did you know they are a Canadian invention? Cross-cutting of match pine deals for the making of match blocks. These in turn are used for the making of match sticks. This job is carried out by an older match worker, around 1915.


Another of the matches produced by E.B. Eddy.
Another of the matches produced by E.B. Eddy.

Even if it isn’t specifically identified, it has characteristics that make it a close relative to the Eddystone Torch.


One of the very first matches made by Ezra Butler Eddy during the 1855-1860 period.
One of the very first matches made by Ezra Butler Eddy during the 1855-1860 period.

Hand-made with white or yellow phosphorus they release toxic gases. A child could be poisoned and die if he bite into one of them. This match was called the Eddystone Torch!


1919 Drawing illustrating an E.B. Eddy Company Silent Parlor Match match-box
1919 Drawing illustrating an E.B. Eddy Company Silent Parlor Match match-box

The match-sticks travel by millions on the assembly-line, between dipping-baths and drying stops.
The match-sticks travel by millions on the assembly-line, between dipping-baths and drying stops.

Match stick making.
Match stick making.

The match-sticks are stuck on the assembly-line that carries them along to a dipping-machine where they are dipped in various chemical products and dried until they become full-fledged matches.


Sketch of a cooper tightening the staves of a barrel.
Sketch of a cooper tightening the staves of a barrel.

The Rustic Economy
The Rustic Economy

The Rustic Economy, the way of making houses.


1903 Twenty-dollar bank-note issued by the Bank of Ottawa.
1903 Twenty-dollar bank-note issued by the Bank of Ottawa.

James MacLaren’s photograph is at the centre. On the left is a log-driver at work and to the right is a ship moored to a wharf with grain elevators in the background, waiting to be loaded with wheat.


1906 Five-dollar bank-note issued by the Bank of Ottawa.
1906 Five-dollar bank-note issued by the Bank of Ottawa.

The centre of the note is taken up by a shanty scene in which lumberjacks are piling logs.


1874 First $4 bank note issued by the Bank of Ottawa.
1874 First $4 bank note issued by the Bank of Ottawa.

To the left can be seen the photograph of George Bryson and to the right that of James MacLaren, both lumber barons.

Labour Payment Schedule
Labour Payment Schedule

A Newfoundland born Canadian with a life long interest in woodworking, baking and anything else that peaks my curiosity.

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