1902 A patent illustration for a bridging device.
Vintage Logging

Vintage logging – band saw mills

Each Saturday morning I review 10 vintage logging, forestry and saw milling photos. This week’s review of vintage logging is about band saw mills.

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1904 Illustration of patent for a band saw mill
1904 Illustration of patent for a band saw mill

Inventor Charles E. Cleveland of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, US claims an improvement to the band saw mill whereby he provide the means of an automatic fluid-pressure saw-straining device to provide tension to the blade.


1908 Illustration of patent to improve Twin Band Saw Mill
1908 Illustration of patent to improve Twin Band Saw Mill

Inventor Charles E. Cleveland of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin claims an improvement to the log feed mechanism for the twin band saw mill.


1902 A patent illustration for a bridging device.
1902 A patent illustration for a bridging device.

Inventor Hermann G. Dittbenner of Minneapolis, Minnesota claims invention to the improvements of the double ege band saw mill improving the bridging devices for bridging over the space between the log deck and the carriage without interrupting or itnerfering with the actions of the lumber conveyor or conveying means, and to also improve the lumber conveyng device.


1909 Illustration of patent for an imporved band saw mill
1909 Illustration of patent for an imporved band saw mill

Inventor Abel D. Catlin, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, claims improvements to the vertical band saw mill, in particular, a means for guiding the band saw at a point adjacent to the log or other piece being sawed.


1914 Illustration of patent for a Shingle Block Saw Mill
1914 Illustration of patent for a Shingle Block Saw Mill

Inventor Henry C. Hansen of Hoquiam, Washington, claims an invention especially designed for use in cutting off shingle blocks.


1916 Illustration of patent for taking boards from teh saw
1916 Illustration of patent for taking boards from teh saw

Inventor Fletcher L. Walker and Hermann G. Dittbenner of Minneapolis, MN claim an improvement in band saw milling, the objective is to imporve the means for taking the boards from teh saw as they are cut form the log, turning the same from vertical to horizontal positions, and delivering the same to the feed rollers of the mill.


1944 Sawmill at Pacific Mills
1944 Sawmill at Pacific Mills.

Steam powered head rig, carriage and log turner at Potlatch Idaho sawmill.
Steam powered head rig, carriage and log turner at Potlatch Idaho sawmill.

1944 Sawmill operator at Pacific Mills.
1944 Sawmill operator at Pacific Mills.

1975 at Weyerhauser Mill B in Everett WA.
1975 at Weyerhauser Mill B in Everett WA.

The log was 10′ in diameter on the small end and 40′ long. The bandmill had wheels that were 10′ in diameter width and saw blade 65′ in length x 16″ wide x 0.25″ thick.


A Newfoundland born Canadian with a life long interest in woodworking, baking and anything else that peaks my curiosity.

3 Comments

  • Richard D Inskeep

    we had quad gang bands, up dogs, small(er) log mill …big Log Mill Headrigs
    at, Edward Hines Lumber Co @ Hines, OR

    That Weyco setup in Washington is the largest band mill I’ve ever encountered…
    in ’79 after St Helens, I imagine the need for that big bad boy disappeared

    Jim Barry…..I’ve got some old prints fron Ken Brauner….still like to obtain some more or simlar
    ….don’t have to be
    fancy….ideas

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