1912 Felling a big tree with axes.
Vintage Logging

Vintage logging – Winter

Each Saturday morning I review 10 vintage logging, forestry and saw milling photos. This week’s review of vintage logging is about winter time logging. With the recent hot days, looking at these pictures may offer a cool respite from the heat.

1898 Winter logging scene.
1898 Winter logging scene.

Photograph shows men from Turner Logging Company standing in the snow around a freshly cut tree which was hauled to Sunset Mill near Sattley, Sierra County. Notice the huge cross cut saw leaning against the tree.
Rights Information: Feb 28 2019 Special permission granted by the owning institution, California State University, Chico, CA, US, to WoodchuckCanuck.com, for use of this image for historical logging special collection review. Source: http://www.cdlib.org/


1900 Edwards Mill, Ottawa, Ontario
1900 Edwards Mill, Ottawa, Ontario

The Edwards Mill at Rideau Falls in Ottawa.


1903 Winter logging
1903 Winter logging

Winter has always been a great time to harvest timber, and here is a great example of how steam power was used to haul a big load of logs in Cheboygan, Michigan (about as far north as you can go before the U.P.). The rig is a Phoenix, c. 1903-05, built in Wisconsin.


1905 Port Blakely lumber mill, Washington.
1905 Port Blakely lumber mill, Washington.

Six ships in dock. Handwritten on verso are the names of ships and their captains.

The ENGELHORN was a four-masted British bark out of Liverpool. It was built in 1899 and went missing in 1914. E. H. Lovitt was captain from 1899 until at least 1907. The BRACADALE was a four-masted British bark out of Glasgow, later known as the Norwegian SVOLDER (1909). It was built in 1887 and wrecked in 1911. H. J. S. Youlden was captain from 1893 until at least 1907. The ALBANIA was a three-masted Norwegian bark, previously known as the British ship CITY OF GLASGOW. It was built in 1867, re-named ALBANIA in 1900, re-rigged as a bark in 1903, and abandoned at sea in 1907. Jens Christensen was captain from 1903 until the vessel’s loss in 1907. The WANDERER was a four-masted British bark out of Liverpool. It was built in 1891 and sunk in 1907 after a collision with another vessel. T. Dunning was captain from 1902 until at least 1907. The LYMAN D. FOSTER was a four-masted American schooner out of San Francisco. It was built in 1892 and wrecked in 1913. D. O. Killman was captain from 1900 until at least 1907. The CRESCENT was a five-masted American schooner out of San Francisco. It was built in 1904 and burned in 1918. Theodore Olson was captain from 1904 until the vessel’s destruction in 1907.


1908 JM Craig hauling 4ft cord wood
1908 JM Craig hauling 4ft cord wood

Steam log hauler (Lombard type), owned by J.M. Craig, Sherbrooke. Operated by him in Mégantic District. Load 60 cord of 4 ft pulp wood. Weight of load 200,000 lbs.


1910 Fort Davis
1910 Fort Davis

Construction workers at Fort Davis, Alaska, notching beams.


1912 Men loading logs onto flatbed railway car in snow covered forest.
1912 Men loading logs onto flatbed railway car in snow covered forest.

Near Vancouver, BC.


1912 The Loader, woodsmen loading logs on cars with a donkey engine.
1912 The Loader, woodsmen loading logs on cars with a donkey engine.

Somewhere in British Columbia.


1914 Visitor watching as tree is felled.
1914 Visitor watching as tree is felled.

Watching a big tree go down never gets old. Somewhere in British


1912 Felling a big tree with axes.
1912-Two men standing on planks while felling a tree with axes.

Felling a tree with axes, near Vancouver, BC.


A Newfoundland born Canadian with a life long interest in woodworking, baking and anything else that peaks my curiosity.

2 Comments

  • Kathryn R Gavel

    Hello–I loved your page!
    I am writing a novel set in 1928-1934 that includes a lumber mill/sawmill along the Mississippi river in northern Wisconsin. Your pictures and info are very helpful. Since the sawmill is in the background of the story I don’t need to know every detail of running a mill, but want to make sure whatever I mention is accurate. Can you reccomend references?
    Thanks,
    K

    • Jim Barry

      I would recommend you visit forestryforum.com and go to the Sawmill forum. Sign up and make a posting with a title something like, ‘I am writing a novel and have questions about early sawmills’. Then ask a few questions you need answers too. I am certain you will get help from folks. If you have followup questions, simply keep asking them in that same discussion thread to keep people intersted and in the loop (they will be notified) when the discussion gets activity.

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